A roads classic (and correction) — edward i. tinkham and the first

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Software Images icon An illustration of two photographs. Images Donate icon An illustration of a heart shape Donate Ellipses icon An illustration of text ellipses. It is evident such a book will be useful not only to the church but to all desirous of reviewing the lessons of the past ; and per- haps no apology is required, beyond regrets that the work has been done in such an imper- fect manner.

This, however, from a pressure of other duties, was unavoidable. The book lays no claim to literary excellence, and goes forth with the desire that it may be profitable, if not faultless as a scholarly production. Some years ago the propriety of such a work was seen, but few materials could then be found.

Recently the diary of Elder Daniel Hix, his list of baptisms, and the church records of the old Baptist organization, were obtained from Mrs. Rachel Davis of Westport, to whom the thanks of writer and readers are due. Indebtedness is also thankfully acknowledged to General Ebenezer W. Peirce, Rev. Roberts, Rev. Gofif, Rev.

Moses How, Rev. Batch- elor, Rev. George N. Kelton, Jesse W.See what's new with book lending at the Internet Archive. Search icon An illustration of a magnifying glass. User icon An illustration of a person's head and chest. Sign up Log in.

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Images Donate icon An illustration of a heart shape Donate Ellipses icon An illustration of text ellipses. Like phantoms painted on the magic slide, Forth from the darkness of the past we glide, As living shadows for a moment seen ; Traced by a rug from one unchanging flame, 'I hen seek the dust and stillness whence we came.

Some years ago an insignificant-appearing, although well- dressed young man of "dandy-like" manners, when talking with a business man, said: "I want you to understand that I am a descendant of the noted Lord Bernham, of England.

In first starting to trace up the genealogy my object was simply to prove my ancestry so as to secure membership in the society called the Sons of the American Revolution, but I had so much trouble and started on so many false scents that it inspired me with a resolution to conquer the problems presented. I became so much interested that I decided to tabulate the results of my researches for the benefit of my children and for relatives, knowing that as the years passed it would constantly become more difficult to secure the information.

I desire particularly, however, to acknowledge the great help received from Miss t-mma Goring, of St. Catherine's, Ontario, and Levi F. Bauder, of Cleveland, Chio. I have also made several lengthy trips to consult with people who were possessed of certain information which was important and I visited the old family home towns in Massachusetts, New York, Ohio and Canada.

a roads classic (and correction) — edward i. tinkham and the first

Much time has been spent in the great genea- logical libraries in Boston, Chicago and Washington, D. C, in addition to many of the state and city libraries, searching thousands of volumes of genealogies, town and county his- tories, reference books, war records, census books, English and Canadian historical works, etc.

Also in looking over the manuscripts in the War and Pension Departments in Wash- ington and examining an immense mass of old letters and papers in the hands of relatives.

Edward Thomas's In Pursuit of Spring - historic photo locations revisited

I have employed profes- sional genealogists to assist in the search and several friends in England and Canada have delved into the libraries and official court records and vital statistics of these countries. This book is the result, and by frequent revision I have tried to give exact information. I do not claim that it is absolutely correct and infallible, for "I cannot say what the truth may be.A speculative thought but I wonder if he had contracted influenza during the great pandemic in late and never fully recovered, leaving himself vulnerable.

A significant percentage of influenza victims died of pneumonia.

The Unseen History of Our Roads

Found this very interesting, and thank you for linking to your previous series about Edward Tinkham, which was much more than I have learned about him.

I recently started a blog about WWI aviation, so I posted yesterday with a link to yours and included the only useful thing I have right now to add: Tinkham's obituary from the book Military Records of Cornell University in the World War.

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First flags are often confused, especially due to publicity. The important issue for me, is that we seek to correct history to better understand it, and not hold first drafts or POVs as infallible. Now all roads lead to France and heavy is the tread Of the living; but the dead returning lightly dance. Edward Thomas, Roads. Tinkham and the First American Flag. Since I have been publishing Roads to the Great War I haven't had to publish a correction, but this one is necessary and only fair to all the parties involved, which include two of America's leading universities, two American heroes who died serving in the war, and two of the regular contributors to this blog.

In August we presented a series by Patrick Gregory about how the Stanford University contingent of American Field Service volunteers, led by a distinguished young man named Arthur Kimber, was designated by Secretary of War Newton Baker to carry the first American flag to the battlefields of Europe, after the nation's declaration of war. They achieved their mission in a well-publicized ceremony in June of Patrick's story was fully accurate in all details.

Unfortunately, your humble editor now very, very humble had major memory breakdown when he posted that series. It turns out that not only is there another claimant to the "First Flag Presented" honor, but I published a series covering that very group in January Luckily for me, my friend and author of that series, Jim Patton, quickly pointed out the conflicting postings for me.

I've been wrestling with how to sort this out since then, and now I'm going to give it a try. First, the other side of the story. It turns out that when America declared war, there was already another American Field Service unit in place in France. It was from Cornell University, and it was led by a dynamic young man named Edward Tinkham. His unit carried an American flag into the front when it went into action at the Chemin des Dames sector on 23 Mayabout a month before the Stanford group's ceremony.

It apparently did not receive the same level of publicity as the other group, and perhaps may have been forgotten, except that 14 years after the event, it received formal recognition from President Herbert Hoover at a memorial dedication at Cornell University. Now, how can I make amends for contributing to the confusion?

The one thing that transcends the conflicting claims is the story of both of the men who led their universitys' efforts, Arthur Kimber of Stanford and Edward Tinkham of Cornell. Both started with the American Field Service, delivered their flags, became military pilots, died in service, and are buried in Europe. Since Edward's story is the one I forgot about, I'm going to reacquaint our readers with his story first. Below is the last article in Jim Patton's series, to provide some context, along with links to the other pieces.

We will re-post Arthur Kimber's story at a later date.There are also original manuscripts and typescript poems, with some drafts of poems written between andincluding 11 scores of poems set to music, one prose manuscript, his school reports, nine notebooks containing press cuttings, flower pressings and fragments of prose, and a wicker basket containing his watch, tobacco box, a badge, button, lavender bag, clay pipes, scarves, wallet and visiting cards.

This year she peeped out in February, and coldly wept through March, and in April burst upon us in all her dancing splendour, so that old men have shaken their heads and declared that there never was such a Spring. She has stirred in us more than ever her own aspiration of life; even we, who have been but waiting for her advent, have answered her call to now life so that we have grudged our limitations, longed for powers of work and growth not yet developed among men.

But Mr. He had to be up and out after her, to meet her on her way, to welcome her. He did a better thing than that, jollier if less luxurious, and one which proves the sincerity of his quest. They were not growing there, but some child had gathered them below at Stowey or Durleigh, and then, getting tired of them, bad dropped them.

They were beginning to wilt, but they lay upon the grave of Winter. I was quite sure of that.

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Winter may rise up through mould alive with violets and primroses and daffodils, but when cowslips and bluebells have grown over his grave he cannot rise again: ho is dead and rotten, and from his ashes the blossoms are springing.

Therefore I was very glad to ace them. And he was right to be glad, whatever old men may say who can remember snow in June. He had set out on a good pilgrimage, on a worthy quest, and he had achieved it —.

Thomas tells his adventures of mind and body on his journey; and a very pleasant wind-swept book the telling makes. Hudson, of Hardy, of Barnes and others, and his thoughts on them are just and sincere as are his thoughts on the weather and the inns and the beauty of the country and the character of the people be meets.

All are woven together in a fresh and delightful book, which every lover of poetry and the open air and honest writing will appreciate. Facebook Twitter Pinterest. Topics Spring. Wildlife Poetry First world war features. Reuse this content.That is the funniest account of WWI tanks that I've ever read.

a roads classic (and correction) — edward i. tinkham and the first

The cane! Too good for words! Now all roads lead to France and heavy is the tread Of the living; but the dead returning lightly dance. Edward Thomas, Roads. The operation bears the name "Battle of Flers—Courcelette" in many sources. Tanks were used at both those fortified villages that day.

The attack against Flers is considered the most successful use of tanks in the attack. Big metal things they were, with two sets of caterpillar wheels that went right round the body. There was a huge bulge on each side with a door in the bulging part, and machine guns on swivels poked out from either side.

I was attached to battalion headquarters and the colonel, adjutant, sergeant-major, and myself with four signalers had come up to the front line. From this position the colonel could see his men leave the assembly trench, move forward with the tanks, jump over us and advance to the enemy trenches.

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As a new style of attack he thought it would be one of the highlights of the war. While it was still dark we heard the steady drone of heavy engines, and by the time the sun had risen the tanks were approaching our front line, dead on time. The Germans must have heard them too, and, although they had no idea what to expect, they promptly laid down a heavy curtain of fire on our front line.

This had the effect of making us keep our heads down, but every now and again we felt compelled to pop up and look back to see how the tanks were progressing. It was most heartening to watch their advance, we were almost ready to cheer. But there was a surprise in store for us. Instead of going on to the German lines the three tanks assigned to us straddled our front line, stopped and then opened up a murderous machine gun fire, enfilading us left and right. There they sat, squat monstrous things, noses stuck up in the air, crushing the sides of our trench out of shape with their machine guns swiveling around and firing like mad.

Everyone dived for cover, except the colonel. He jumped on top of the parapet, shouting at the top of his voice, "Runner, runner, go tell those tanks to stop firing at once.

At once, I say. Although, what with the sounds of the engines and the firing in such an enclosed space, no one in the tank could hear him, they finally realized they were on the wrong trench and moved on, frightening the Jerries out of their wits and making them scuttle like frightened rabbits.

One of the tanks got caught up on a tree stump and never reached their front line, and a second had its rear steering wheels shot off and could not guide itself. The crew thought it more prudent to stop, so they told us afterwards, rather than to keep going as they felt they might go out of control and run on until they reached Berlin. The third tank went on and ran through Flers, flattening everything they thought should be flattened, pushing down walls and thoroughly enjoying themselves, our lads coming up behind them, taking over the village, or what was left of it, and digging in on the line prescribed for them before the attack.

This was one of the rare occasions when they had passed through the enemy fire and they were enjoying themselves chasing and rounding up the Jerries, collecting thousands of prisoners and sending them back to our lines escorted only by Pioneers armed with shovels. The four men in the tank that had got itself hung up dismounted, all in the heat of the battle, stretching themselves, scratching their heads, then slowly and deliberately walked round their vehicle inspecting it from every angle and appeared to hold a conference among themselves.

After standing around for a few minutes, looking somewhat lost, they calmly took out from the inside of the tank a primus stove and, using the side of the tank as a cover from enemy fire, sat down on the ground and made themselves some tea.During the early morning negotiations 11 November in that railway carriage at Compiegne, the British naval delegate, Admiral Sir Wester Wemyss, had wanted to demand the entire German submarine fleet, but Lloyd George had made him reduce the number to He was surprised and delighted when the German delegate, a Captain Vanselow, replied that there weren't left to be handed over.

Wemyss promptly inserted "all submarines " into the text of the armistice agreement they were working on. Now all roads lead to France and heavy is the tread Of the living; but the dead returning lightly dance. Edward Thomas, Roads. Their campaign against Allied shipping did not begin until earlyand after several starts and stops, unrestricted submarine warfare did not begin until February Over the next year, the Allies lost more than 5.

The U-boat threat was brought under control during the last year of the war, primarily through the implementation by the Royal Navy of escorted convoys, a measure that it had initially resisted. Convoying greatly complicated the open-ocean search problem for German submarines, because a group of ships was not much more likely to be found than a single ship, while escorts reduced the damage that submarines could cause when they did succeed in finding ships to attack. It is important to note that escorts were much less effective at actually destroying submarines than they were at limiting their effectiveness by forcing them to submerge after their initial attack, which generally allowed the rest of the convoy to escape.

Therefore, in an important sense, the political effects of the campaign negated its military effects, because Britain probably would not have survived the First Battle of the Atlantic if the Royal Navy and the British merchant marine had continued to face the U-boats on their own.

The submarines that fought World War I were surface ships which were expected to submerge only in order to attack and escape better-armed surface targets, but which also lost a considerable portion of their mobility and situational awareness when submerged and, therefore, much of their potential offensive power. This characteristic was of course based largely on technical constraints, but it was also a function of expectations about their primary mission, which was assumed in most cases to be coastal defense or fleet cooperation, both of which contemplated attacks against major naval assets, against which surface engagements were suicidal.

The German campaign against Allied merchant shipping demonstrated instead that attacks against merchant ships could be most effectively prosecuted at night, on the surface, at relatively close range, even in the face of escorts. The challenge was to maximize the effects of these attacks, escape the escorts alerted by these attacks, and reengage.

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This lesson drove the German submarine force toward the operational and tactical methods it employed in its World War II guerre de coursewhich emphasized night surface attacks by groups of submarines which would pursue individual convoys and repeatedly attack them over a period of a week or two. Wolf pack tactics did not demand a radically new type of submarine, and German interwar submarine designs were evolutionary, emphasizing longer range and endurance and larger torpedo salvos and magazines.

The most important technical development that made wolf packs possible was the maturation of high frequency HF radio as a command and control mechanism.

HF radio provided over-the-horizon performance from a relatively small, low-powered transmitter, and allowed deployed submarines to report convoy sightings to a central command post, which could then broadcast this information to all other submarines in that broad ocean area, allowing them to marshal for a concentrated attack by a dozen or so submarines.

a roads classic (and correction) — edward i. tinkham and the first

Using night surface attacks, these wolf packs would strike the convoy simultaneously, from multiple azimuths, with multiple torpedo salvos, and then slip away.

Many such attacks would be conducted over the course of several days, with the wolf pack using the daylight hours to separate from the convoy and race ahead of it on the surface to get into firing position for the following night.

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My own deep interest in the church with which my father was for so many years con- nected, has led me to make a systematic study of its founda- tion, the lives of the founders, and the chain of events leading down to the present time.

In the arrangement of material each of the five meeting houses erected on or near the site of the present one has been given a chapter. The authorities will be found in the adjoin- ing list. From these, extensive quotations have been made, and as far as possible the records tell the story. The early records of the town, school, and church are very imperfect; in Eliot's petition to the General Court, June 29,for a renewal of the school charter, he says, " Our first book and charter were burned in ye burning of John John- son's house" But from the records are in a tolerably good condition, although the events are not always recorded in sequence.

Amos Adams notes in reference to the church records, " Inasmuch as some things worthy of notice are not as I find mentioned in this Book and others yt are, are mentioned in divers places scattered up and down, I have thot proper here to insert ye following articles, follow- ing ye Revd. Eliot and Danforth's annals of events. In the town of Brookline organized an independent church.

Pleasant Congregational, now All Soul's. From this we see that for nearly two hundred years this was the only church within the limits of Roxbury proper. It has been difficult to get details of the lives of many of those prominent in the church, and many who were prominent in the town and in public life are unnoticed, as there is no mention of them in the church records. This is by no means proof that they were not members.

During the last century a large number hired seats, and, attending the church regu- larly, considered themselves members of the church, but as it is well nigh impossible to learn the names of all of these, they have been omitted, and I have limited myself throughout to those mentioned in the records. In the brief biographies of the early members the date of baptism has been given Avhenevcr possible, as this shows that one or both parents were church members.


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